About Tinos

Location
History
Architecture
Marble and Sculpture
Weather

 

 

 

  

 

Location

Image of a map of Tinos Greece within the Northern Cyclades complex. Tinos is the third biggest island of the Cyclades after Naxos and Andros.Tinos is situated in the Aegean Sea and it belongs to the Northern Cyclades complex. It is the third biggest island of the Cyclades after Naxos and Andros.

It’s quite close to Athens and very easy to get here.  You can leave either from Piraeus or from Rafina, which is very close to Eleftherios Venizelos Athens International Airport. It takes 20 min by bus from the airport to Rafina, and depending on the type of boat, either 2 hours (fast sea jet) or 4 hours (large ferry boat) from there, or  and 2.5-5 hours from Piraeus.  Ferry schedules are published on the internet, e.g. http://www.ferries.gr/greek-islands-ferry/

Tinos is very close to Mykonos, which has an international airport, and is also connected to Syros, Andros, Paros, Naxos and Santorini.

The Symposium venue is at the harbor, and many hotels are nearby. They usually have shuttles from the hotel to the harbor.

History

The history of Tinos is rich and dates back to the ancient years. Neptune was worshiped and Aeolos was believed to be living there. It was also a purgatory for those preparing to go to Delphi.

In antiquity the Tinians were traditionally allies of the Athenians, and participated in the battles against invaders.

Because of its geopolitical position, the inhabitants have suffered from many conquerors until the Middle Ages. This is the reason why the Venetians, who occupied the island from 1207 to 1715, built on Exombourgo a tower to protect the island until the Ottoman occupation. The architecture of Tinos is highly influenced by the period of Venetian domination.

The island was perhaps the last part of Greek territory conquered by the Ottomans after repeated failed attempts.  During the liberation war of 1821 Tinos contributed significantly to the revolution. The discovery of Virgin Mary’s holy icon in 1823 was considered a good sign for the uprising and has been a religious pilgrimage for the island ever since. Tinos and Syros are the two islands in Greece with large Catholic population at present, and this co-existence is reflected in culture, life and architecture.

Architecture

A photo of a small building in Tinos decorated with geometrical figures and patterns taken from nature, such as cypress trees.An island dedicated to perfection and unpolluted beauty, Tinos boasts a marvelous tradition in architectural shapes. A mixture of Venetian influences, Orthodox and Catholic lines adorn the older buildings and houses of the island which bear arches, marble cravings and light blue or green colours on their doors and windows.

White and green marble, a principal product of the island, and granite could not but decorate the white washed houses and numerous churches throughout the island.

Venetian craftsmen with artistic flair started building dovecotes, mainly in the central and eastern part of the island, in the shape of small buildings decorated with geometrical figures and patterns taken from nature, such as cypress trees. More than a hundred dovecotes are saved till nowadays and have influenced the island’s architecture.

Beyond parish churches, rural chapels  all white, are innumerable and can be found everywhere in the countryside of Tinoson the mountain peaks, on rocky landscapes, near beaches, in plain fields, beside paths and roads, generally anyplace a Tinian believer can imagine. Those chapels fill and enrich the countryside. They comprise an integral part of the landscape and are a trade mark for Tinos. Everyday there is certainly one church celebrating somewhere. Small church festivities enliven nature and constitute genuine assemblies of the islanders.

Marble and Sculpture

Tinos has many marble quarries and a long history of sculpture.  More than 1000 Tinian marble craftsmen created masterpieces of folk art. Innumerable masterpieces are all over the island: lintels decorated with ships, fishes, pigeons and trees, coats of arms in marble pediments over the doors, marble fountains, cemeteries and churches. Both in the harbor town and in the village of Pyrgos there are sculpture museums. In Pyrgos there is a museum of Marble Crafts and a School of Fine Arts.

Weather

Especially in late August weather is mild, and the north winds of the summer have abated.  More on the weather can be found in: https://weatherspark.com/averages/32206/Syros-Siros-South-Aegean-Greece

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