IAPR Fellow

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Aug. 17, 2018

Ross elected a Fellow of IAPR 

Arun Ross, professor of computer science and engineering at Michigan State University, has been elected a Fellow of the International Association of Pattern Recognition (IAPR). The fellowship will be presented at the 2018 International Conference on Pattern Recognition in Beijing, China, Aug. 20-24.Arun Ross is an internationally recognized expert on pattern recognition, machine learning, computer vision, and biometrics. 

The honor of Fellow of IAPR is given to no more than a quarter of a percent of the total IAPR membership every other year. Twenty new fellows will be honored in 2018. 

Ross is an internationally recognized expert on pattern recognition, machine learning, computer vision, and biometrics. He is the director of MSU’s Integrated Pattern Recognition and Biometrics Lab (iProbe). He joined the MSU faculty in January 2013, coming from West Virginia University. 

In July 2018, he was an invited speaker among the international experts in policing, border security, cybersecurity, counter-terrorism, asylum policy and identity management at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Identity and Security in Lausanne, Switzerland.

He previously received two “Under 40” international recognitions.

In 2014, he received the J.K. Aggarwal Prize in Stockholm, Sweden, from the International Association for Pattern Recognition (IAPR), acknowledging his research contributions on biometric fusion, fingerprint analysis, iris recognition, and biometric privacy. The prize is given to a scientist under the age of 40 who has brought a substantial contribution and impact to the pattern recognition field.

In 2013, he received the inaugural Young Biometrics Investigator Award from the International Association for Pattern Recognition (IAPR), presented at the International Conference on Biometrics in Madrid, Spain.

Also, in May 2013 he was an invited panelist at a special event organized by the United Nations Counter-Terrorism Committee (CTC) at the UN Headquarters.

Ross earned doctoral (1999) and master’s (2003) degrees in computer science and engineering from MSU and a bachelor’s degree (1996) in computer science from the Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani, India.

As part of his biometrics research, Arun Ross demonstrates a kind of fake iris used to test a powerful algorithm his team created using IARPA funding to thwart iris spoof attacks. (MSUToday photo).Read more on his research in this MSUToday feature: Unlocking New Possibilities For Biometrics