April 2019

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MICROBES IN WATER: METHODS TO EVALUATE SOURCES, TEMPORAL VARIABILITY, AND POTENTIAL DISEASE SIGNALS

MICROBES IN WATER: METHODS TO EVALUATE SOURCES, TEMPORAL VARIABILITY, AND POTENTIAL DISEASE SIGNALS

Event Date/Time: 
April 8, 2019 - 12:00pm
Event Location: 
Room C103 Engineering Research Complex
Speaker: 
Huiyun Wu
Ph.D. Dissertation Defense

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Ph.D. Dissertation Defense

 

Monday, April 8, 2019 @ 12:00 p.m.

C103 Engineering Research Complex

 

 

MICROBES IN WATER: METHODS TO EVALUATE SOURCES, TEMPORAL VARIABILITY, AND POTENTIAL DISEASE SIGNALS

 

by

Huiyun Wu

Advisor:  Dr. Irene Xagoraraki

 

 

 

 

Abstract:

 

Microbial contamination in waters has been one of the most pressing environmental health concerns in the world and the US. Understanding sources, temporal variability, and transport pathways of microbes in water is critical for the development of watershed remediation and pollution prevention plans. Furthermore, understating the occurrence of pathogens in water and its relationship to human and animal health may facilitate early detection and prevention of disease. This dissertation focuses on the study of impaired water bodies in the Great Lakes basin. In particular, maximum pollutant loading and its relationship to hydrological events is studied, microbial pollution source identification methods are investigated, and methods for analyzing water samples to identify disease signals are explored. The selected sites, located in Michigan, are sites for which Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) requirement for bacteria have been identified by the state and watershed management plans are being developed.

04/08/2019 - 12:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
 
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DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID NANOFOAM AND ITS FUNCTIONALIZED MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES

DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID NANOFOAM AND ITS FUNCTIONALIZED MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES

Event Date/Time: 
April 17, 2019 - 3:00pm
Event Location: 
Room 3546D Engineering Building
Speaker: 
Mingzhe Li
PhD Dissertation Defense

 

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Ph.D. Dissertation Defense

 

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Time: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Room 3546 EB 

 

DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF LIQUID NANOFOAM AND ITS FUNCTIONALIZED MATERIALS AND STRUCTURES

 

by

Mingzhe Li

Advisor:  Dr. Weiyi Lu

 

 

 

Abstract:

 

The use of energy absorption materials and structures for protection in collision, explosion, and impact attacks has long been recognized as one of the most effective approaches to reduce and prevent personnel injuries and infrastructure damages. These systems have been widely used in many industrial, medical, and military applications. Recently, an advanced energy absorption material, liquid nanofoam (LN), has been developed with high energy absorption capacity as well as high energy mitigation rate. The LN system, composed of a liquid phase and a hydrophobic nanoporous media, employs the pressurized liquid flow in nano-channels as its energy absorption mechanism. However, previous studies of the LN mainly focused on the quasi-static behaviors. Only limited effort had been made to understand the working mechanism of the LN under dynamic impacts which are the practical loading condition in scenarios such as auto collisions, blunt impacts and blasts. This dissertation presents the first systematic experimental study on the dynamic behavior of the LN system and reveals the deformation mechanism of LN under high strain rates. These scientific findings open up new applications of the LN functionalized materials and structures.

The intermediate and high strain rate responses of LN systems have been characterized by a lab-customized drop tower apparatus. The competition between liquid infiltration and porous structure deformation at high strain rates has been elucidated at nanoscale. Results show that liquid infiltration into nanopores is independent of the axial buckling stress of the nanopore, and thus is the dominating deformation mechanism of the LN. More importantly, the activation of liquid infiltration as well as liquid flow in nanopores are much faster than the nanoscale porous structure deformation. This much-enhanced liquid flow speed in nano-environment is experimentally quantified for the first time. It has been demonstrated that the liquid infiltration speed is adaptive to the impact energy level, which provides mechanistic explanation for the high energy absorption efficiency of LN at high strain rates. Results also suggest that LN in the liquid marble form performs better than the liquid form upon high strain rate impact due to the macroscopically homogenous structure in the liquid marble form.

Based on the fundamental understanding of the deformation mechanism and the adaptive nanoscale liquid flow, LN has been integrated into other materials and structures to generate multifunctional materials and structures, e.g. LN-filled tube (LNFT), hybrid hydrogel, and advanced seat belt retractor system. In LNFT, LN is utilized as a novel filling material in thin-walled tube. The resulted LNFTs possess enhanced average post-buckling strength and energy absorption capacity due to the “perfect bonding” between the LN and the tube wall. Also, based on the adaptive nanoscale liquid flow, the LNFT is more efficient for energy mitigation at elevated strain rates. In LN-based hybrid hydrogels, LN is formulated and encapsulated in hydrogel by integrating nanoporous particles into the 3D polymer network. Liquid infiltration mechanism, combined with the chemical and physical cross-linking effects, leads to the improvement of both strength and toughness of the hybrid hydrogel, which is not seen in current hydrogels. In LN-based seat belt retractor system, LN is employed as the load-bearing component, which allows additional payout tunability, adaptability, and reusability in the system.

The knowledge gained in this study will facilitate the design of next generation of advanced LN-functionalized materials and structures for extreme working conditions.

04/17/2019 - 3:00pm
 
 
 
 
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DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF CHIP SEALS THROUGH IMAGE-BASED MICROSTRUCTURAL PARAMETERS AND PERFORMANCE TESTS

DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF CHIP SEALS THROUGH IMAGE-BASED MICROSTRUCTURAL PARAMETERS AND PERFORMANCE TESTS

Event Date/Time: 
April 24, 2019 - 2:00pm
Event Location: 
3540 Engineering Building
Speaker: 
Yogesh Kumbargeri
PhD Dissertation Defense Presentation

 

Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering

Ph.D. Dissertation Defense

 

Wednesday, April 24, 2019

Time: 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm

Seminar Room 3540 EB 

 

DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF CHIP SEALS THROUGH IMAGE-BASED

MICROSTRUCTURAL PARAMETERS AND PERFORMANCE TESTS

 

by

Yogesh Kumbargeri

Advisor:  Dr. M. Emin Kutay

 

 

 

Abstract:

 

 

Chip seal is one of the most popularly adopted pavement preservation strategies. A chip seal treatment is constructed by adding hot asphalt or emulsion on the surface of an existing pavement, spraying aggregates on the top, followed by roller compaction. Extensive research has led to the formulation of various chip seal analysis and design methodologies. These methods are mostly empirical in nature and depend on numerous assumptions related to chip seal microstructure and their expected behavior after compaction in field. Hence, there is a need for in-depth analysis of chip seals to develop performance-based design methods addressing the primary distresses as well as the microstructural parameters such as percent embedment and aggregate orientation. The objective of this research study was to evaluate chip seals through image-based microstructural parameters and performance tests. The results of a comprehensive experimental program lead to development of a holistic approach to chip seal design, encompassing various aspects of chip seal performance through aggregate-binder microstructural perspective. New image processing techniques were developed to understand the percent embedment and aggregate orientation behavior. Additionally, finite element analyses were performed using actual chip seal images to evaluate mechanistic characteristics (e.g., magnitudes of strains at the aggregate/binder interface) responsible for chip seal performance. Further, extensive performance tests were run in laboratory to evaluate the effect of design parameters (e.g. percent embedment, aggregate orientation) on chip seal performance distresses (aggregate loss and bleeding). The results were combined and analyzed to yield new insights into effect of microstructural parameters on chip seal performance. Furthermore, a performance-based design procedure was developed for design of chip seals. This procedure integrates the chip seal microstructural behavior and its performance.

04/24/2019 - 2:00pm
 
Integrated nutrient removal, CO2 mitigation and biogas generation by using microalgal and anaerobic cultures

Integrated nutrient removal, CO2 mitigation and biogas generation by using microalgal and anaerobic cultures

Event Date/Time: 
April 25, 2019 - 10:30am
Event Location: 
3540 Engineering Building
Speaker: 
Dr. Göksel N. Demirer
2018-2019 Seminar Series

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2018-2019 seminar series sponsored by the Guo family

 

Dr. Göksel N. Demirer
 

Professor, Environmental Engineering

The School of Engineering & Technology, Central Michigan University

 

Thursday, April 25 2019

10:30am – 11:30am

3540 Engineering Building

 

Integrated nutrient removal, CO2 mitigation and biogas generation by using microalgal and anaerobic cultures

 

Abstract: Urbanization and population growth have resulted in discharge of anthropogenic nutrients to water bodies. The excess of nutrients in water leads to eutrophication that can have a detrimental effect on aquatic environments. In order to avoid such losses, excess nutrients, i.e., nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P), in the urban and industrial wastewater must be removed prior to their discharge. Nutrient removal is still an unresolved problem in many countries. Microalgal cultures have a very diverse application area in the field of waste management. Microalgal removal of nutrients, organic contaminants, heavy metals and other industrial pollutants from wastewater are among the examples of its use in waste management. Moreover, the harvested biomass from microalgal reactors constitute a raw material for the production of different high-value chemicals and bioenergy such as biogas.  Microalgae cultivation could also be a tool for CO2 sequestration from the stack gasses that offers numerous advantages especially when it is combined with wastewater treatment. This presentation will discuss the integrated nutrient removal, CO2 sequestration and biogas production using microalgal and anaerobic microbial cultures; emphasizing resource efficiency.

 

Biography: Göksel N. Demirer is a Professor of Environmental Engineering in The School of Engineering & Technology at Central Michigan University. Göksel received his BSc and MSc from the Middle East Technical University and his Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University, all in Environmental Engineering. He worked in the Department of Environmental Engineering at Middle East Technical University as a faculty member in 1997-2018 before he joined CMU.  His areas of interest include anaerobic environmental biotechnology, wastewater engineering, waste valorization, resource efficiency, sustainability, pollution prevention, industrial ecology. He has been a visiting professor at Tuzla University (Bosnia-Herzegovina), Washington State University (Pullman, WA), RMIT University (Australia), University of Stuttgart (Germany), and Villanova University (Villanova, PA). He has over 100 peer-reviewed journal publications, over 150 conference proceeding publications, and 7 book/book chapters.

 

04/25/2019 - 10:30am
 
Design Day

Design Day

Event Date/Time: 
April 26, 2019 - 7:30am to 2:30pm
Event Location: 
Engineering Building
Speaker: 
At the end of each semester, the MSU College of Engineering celebrates the achievements of its students by hosting Design Day, where student teams exhibit their design projects and compete for awards.
04/26/2019 - 7:30am to 2:30pm
 
Classes End

Classes End

Event Date/Time: 
April 26, 2019 - 10:00pm
Event Location: 
Speaker: 
Spring semester classes end
04/26/2019 - 10:00pm
 
 
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