February 2018

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Green Chemistry: The Missing Elements

Green Chemistry: The Missing Elements

Event Date/Time: 
February 13, 2018 - 2:00pm
Event Location: 
3540 Engineering Building
Speaker: 
John Warner, Ph.D., President and Chief Technology Officer, Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry, LLC
Seminar

Abstract: Imagine a world where all segments of society demanded environmentally benign products!  Imagine if all consumers, all retailers and all manufacturers insisted on buying and selling only non-toxic materials!  The unfortunate reality is that, even if this situation were to occur, our knowledge of materials science and chemistry would allow us to provide only a small fraction of the products and materials that our economy is based upon.  The way we learn and teach chemistry and materials science is for the most part void of any information regarding mechanisms of toxicity and environmental harm.  Green Chemistry is a philosophy that seeks to reduce or eliminate the use of hazardous materials at the design stage of a materials process.  It has been demonstrated that materials and products CAN be designed with negligible impact on human health and the environment while still being economically competitive and successful in the marketplace.  This presentation will describe the history and background of Green Chemistry and discuss the opportunities for the next generation of materials designers to create a safer and more sustainable future. 

 

Biography:  John is the recipient of the 2014 Perkin Medal, widely acknowledged as the highest honor in American Industrial Chemistry, and was named a 2016 AAAS‐Lemelson Invention Ambassador.  He received his BS in Chemistry from UMASS Boston, and his PhD in Chemistry from Princeton University.  After working at the Polaroid Corporation for nearly a decade, he then served as tenured full professor at UMASS Boston and Lowell (Chemistry and Plastics Engineering).  In 2007 he founded the Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry, LLC (A research organization developing green chemistry technologies) where he serves as President and Chief Technology Officer, and Beyond Benign (a non‐profit dedicated to sustainability and green chemistry education).  He is one of the founders of the field of Green Chemistry, co‐authoring the defining text Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice with Paul Anastas.  He has published nearly 300 patents, papers and books. His recent work in the fields of pharmaceuticals, personal care products, solar energy and construction and paving materials are examples of how green chemistry principles can be immediately incorporated into commercially relevant applications.  Warner was named by ICIS as one of the most influential people impacting the global chemical industries. In 2011 he was elected a Fellow of the American Chemical Society and named one of “25 Visionaries Changing the World” by Utne Reader.


02/13/2018 - 2:00pm
 
 
 
 
 
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Bacteriophages as Surrogates for Human Viruses: Isolation from Environmental Media, Separation, Concentration and Purification

Bacteriophages as Surrogates for Human Viruses: Isolation from Environmental Media, Separation, Concentration and Purification

Event Date/Time: 
February 19, 2018 - 12:00pm
Event Location: 
3540 Engineering Building
Speaker: 
Besarion Lasareishvili, PhD, Assistant Professor, Laboratory of cellular immunology, Agricultural University of Georgia (Tbilisi, Republic of Georgia) and Hang Shi, PhD, Posdoctoral Researcher, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, MSU
Seminar

Abstract

Ensuring the availability of affordable and safe drinking water is one of great global challenges. This presentation will describe our recent efforts that brought together environmental microbiologists with expertise in bacteriophages and environmental engineers with expertise in advanced separations to develop more robust technologies for ensuring the microbiological safety of the water supply. As the work with human and animal viruses is costly, laborious, time consuming and associated with health risks, it is important to have surrogate microorganisms that mimic virus behavior. Bacteriophages can serve as suitable surrogates for enteric human viruses and can be used to test and optimize water treatment systems to improve their ability to remove viral pathogens. In the course of the project, we have isolated multiple phages from various Georgian and U.S. water sources and evaluated them as potential enteric virus surrogates. The selection of surrogate candidates was done based on the charge, size, morphology, and hydrophobicity of the isolated phages. The isolated and characterized phages can be used to test and optimize water filtration systems, to assess effectiveness of different membrane filters in water purification, or can be also used in various medical and environmental virology applications.

02/19/2018 - 12:00pm
 
 
Mechanistic understanding of membrane fouling and mitigation

Mechanistic understanding of membrane fouling and mitigation

Event Date/Time: 
February 21, 2018 - 4:00pm
Event Location: 
3540 Engineering
Speaker: 
Jai Wei Chew, Assistant Professor, School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Seminar

Abstract

Because membrane fouling remains the Achilles’ heel of membrane-based filtration, studies related to improving understandings of the fouling behavior and correspondingly advancing means of fouling mitigation are widespread. One of the focus of our group is on enhancing mechanistic understandings on the deposition and mitigation of particulate foulants in microfiltration processes. Regarding deposition, this talk will present relationships between the extent of fouling and effects of bidisperse particulate foulant size distributions, particle-membrane interactions and oil emulsion stabilized by various surfactants. As for fouling mitigation, the relationship between particle fluidization hydrodynamics and extent of fouling mitigation will be presented, along with the novel means conceived such as flowfield mitigation of membrane fouling (FMMF) and inverse fluidized bed (IFB).

02/21/2018 - 4:00pm
 
 
 
 
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