CSI:Limnology | cross-scale interactions in freshwater landscapes

Team

CSI:Limnology team

Patricia Soranno, PI

Patricia Soranno
I am a Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. I am a landscape limnologist, that is, a freshwater scientist who studies geographical factors that influence aquatic chemistry and biology. I have a strong disciplinary background in freshwater ecology (i.e., limnology), but I have worked hard to incorporate principles and ideas into my work from other disciplines such as geography, spatial sciences, statistical modeling, conservation, and policy. I am interested in using lakes as model systems for examining key questions of macrosystems ecology. I received my B.S. degree from University of Notre Dame and my M.S. and PhD degrees from the University of Wisconsin. I serve on the editorial board of the journal Ecosystems and I am co-director of the Landscape Limnology Research Group.

 

Kendra Spence Cheruvelil, Co-PI

Kendra Spence Cheruvelil
I am an Associate Professor in Lyman Briggs College and the Department of Fisheries. I am a landscape limnologist who works collaboratively to examine the roles that disturbance (human and natural), spatial scale, and heterogeneity have on lake biology and chemistry. I address questions that advance macroecological understanding and are directly applicable to freshwater ecosystem management and conservation. In addition, my research explicitly includes the economic and social factors that affect lakes and drive their management and conservation. My main areas of interest include examining the role of a) aquatic plants (native and alien) and their management in lake foodwebs and b) the landscape in structuring lake biology and chemistry. My students, collaborators, and I use a variety of approaches to conduct our research, such as lake field surveys, mesocosm experiments, and statistical modeling (e.g., multilevel modeling). I am co-director of the Landscape Limnology Research Group.

 

Emily Stanley, Co-PI

Emily Stanley
I am a Professor in the Department of Zoology and the Center for Limnology at the University of Wisconsin. My research interests focus on the ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry of rivers and lakes, and I am the lead PI of the North Temperate Lakes Long Term Ecological Research program. I received my B.S. degree from Yale University and PhD from Arizona State University and am an active member of the Ecological Society of America, American Geophysical Union, and Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, and the Society for Freshwater Sciences. I also serve on the editorial board of Ecological Applications and Marine and Freshwater Research.

 

John Downing, Co-PI

John Downing
I am a Professor of Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology, and the Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering at Iowa State University. My research interests include limnology, aquatic ecology, terrestrial ecology, microbial ecology, biogeochemistry, population conservation, and whole ecosystem restoration and management. I am currently the President of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography, an invited member of the North American Nitrogen Center. I have advised many policy-makers and citizens groups concerning water quality management, I am a frequent consultant to firms and boards regionally, nationally, and internationally, and I received the 2011 Ruth Patrick Award for scientific excellence in solving environmental problems. I received my BS from Hamline University (St. Paul, MN), my MS from NDSU (Fargo, ND) and my PhD from McGill University (Montreal, Canada). I have been at ISU since 1995 and I run the Iowa State University Limnology Lab and have run the state Lake Survey since 2000, which is the principal source of lake restoration plans for the State of Iowa.

 

Pang-Ning Tan, Co-PI

Pang-Ning Tan
I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Michigan State University. I received my MS degree in Physics and PhD degree in Computer Science from University of Minnesota. My research interests span a broad range of data mining problems, from pattern discovery (association analysis, anomaly detection, and cluster analysis) to predictive modeling. In addition to addressing fundamental problems in data mining, I am also interested in applying data mining techniques to various application domains including climate and Earth sciences, social and information networks, botnet and webspam detection, and medical informatics. My research has been supported by the National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, Army Research Office, National Aeronautical and Space Administration, Narus Corporation, and Michigan State University. I am also the author of the book "Introduction to Data Mining", which has been cited more than 1900 times (according to Google Scholar).

 

Noah Lottig, Co-PI

Noah Lottig
I am a Postdoctoral Research Associate at the University of Wisconsin and site manager of the North Temperate Lakes Long-Term Ecological Research Program at Trout Lake. My research interests focus on long-term carbon dynamics of aquatic landscapes. I received his BS from University of Wisconsin-Superior, MS from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, and PhD from University of Wisconsin. I am also an active member of the American Geophysical Union and Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography.

 

Ed Bissell, Database Administrator

Ed Bissell
I am a Database Administrator with extensive experience in the management and application of spatial databases. My background is in Natural Resources (B.S. Fisheries & Wildlife, MSU) and Geographic Information Systems (M.S. Geographic Information Science, MSU). Over the last 10 years, I have worked as a Geographer, GIS & Programmer Analyst, and Database Administrator in various settings including local and federal government and academia. My main interests are developing data automation tools and workflows in support of GIS analysis and the development of Web-based GIS applications. Of particular interest is the application of GIS and spatial database technologies to the domains of natural resource management and landscape ecology.

 

Christopher T. Filstrup, Post-Doctoral Researcher

Christopher T. Filstrup
I am a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Ecology, Evolution, and Organismal Biology Department at Iowa State University. My research interests include limnology, phytoplankton ecology, biogeochemistry, and management of aquatic resources. I received my BS degree from the University of Texas at Austin and my PhD from Baylor University (Waco, TX) where I studied allochthonous organic matter contributions and eutrophication in water supply reservoirs under the direction of Owen T. Lind. Before joining the Iowa State University Limnology Laboratory, I worked for the Center for Spatial Research at Baylor University and was responsible for watershed and lake modeling and teaching introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS) courses for the Geology Department.

 

Caren Scott, Post-Doctoral Researcher

Caren Scott
I am a Postdoctoral Research Associate in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. My research interests include limnology, algal ecology, ecosystem ecology and biogeochemistry. I received my BSc from the University of Michigan, my MSc from the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, and my PhD from the University of Toronto. For my dissertation, I studied benthic algal production and extracellular release under the direction of Ann P. Zimmerman and Don A. Jackson.

 

Sarah Collins, Post-Doctoral Researcher

Sarah Collins
I am a Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. My research interests include limnology, ecosystem ecology, food web ecology, and biogeochemistry. I have a BA from Lewis & Clark College and a PhD from Cornell University. For my PhD, I examined the role of terrestrial subsidies in stream food webs under the direction of Nelson Hairston Jr. and Alex Flecker.

 

Jean-Francois Lapierre, Post-Doctoral Researcher

Jean-Francois Lapierre
I am a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. I am an ecosystem ecologist with research interests focusing on the aquatic carbon cycle. In particular, I am interested by the role that climate, hydrology and landscape properties play on the delivery and processing of various forms of organic carbon in lakes and rivers. I received my BSc and MSc from Université du Québec à Trois-Riviéres, and I received my PhD under the supervision of Paul del Giorgio from Université du Québec à Montréal.

 

C. Emi Fergus, PhD Student

C. Emi Fergus
I am a PhD graduate student in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Michigan State University. My research interests largely fall within the emerging discipline of landscape limnology. In particular I am interested in identifying relationships between multi-spatial scale landscape features and lake water chemistry. To address these relationships I am interested in applying statistical tools such as multilevel mixed-effect models to identify cross-scale interactions that lead to unexpected relationships across broad geographic extents. I am a member of International Association of Landscape Ecology and the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography.

 

Shuai Yuan, PhD Student

Shuai Yuan
I am a PhD student in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering at Michigan State University. I received my MS degree in Statistics from Michigan State University. My research interests are data mining and machine learning, specifically classification, clustering and predictive modeling. I am interested in applying the above techniques to different application domains in geology and limnology, with a focus on climate and lake data. My current research includes developing efficient constrained spectral clustering algorithms and clustering validation.

 

Nick Skaff, Phd Student

Nick Skaff
I am a PhD student in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, and the Environmental Science and Policy Program at Michigan State University. Generally, I am interested in how diseases emerge at the nexus of terrestrial and aquatic landscapes. My current research focuses on the impact of wetland abundance, isolation, and permanence on the prevalence of West Nile virus (WNV) in mosquitoes and humans. I also plan to examine how aquatic habitats reshape the relationship between mosquito WNV prevalence and the number of human WNV cases. I received my B.S. from Tufts University in 2011 with majors in biology and environmental studies and a minor in philosophy. I am excited to leverage this broad background and the LAGOS database to better understand how landscape-scale patterns influence disease dynamics in zoological and human communities.

 

Sam Christel, PhD Student

Sam Christel
I am a MS candidate for Water Resources Management (WRM) at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. My coursework is both science and policy oriented, but is focused on the science of limnology and watershed management. In addition to the WRM program, I work as a graduate project assistant for the Northern Temperate Lakes- Long Term Ecological Research (NTL-LTER) project at the University of Wisconsin Center for Limnology. Most of my work is in the realm of information management, and specifically, with metadata related to NTL-LTER core and associated datasets. However, I am also working on an NTL-LTER sub-project which is investigating methods to visualize and understand long -term change in ecological communities using large well-documented data sets. I am broadly interested in the long term dynamics of aquatic ecosystems, and understanding how human activity has altered natural processes in such ecosystems. My intent is to pursue a PhD project with questions that can be addressed at the intersection of data science and limnology.

 

Luke Winslow, PhD Student

Luke Winslow
I am a PhD student in the Center for Limnology at the University of Wisconsin – Madison. I'm interested in understanding the emergent behavior of lakes on the landscape and am currently working on understanding patterns that emerge from large populations of lakes. My work especially leverages high throughput computing, advanced algorithms, and large datasets to advance the emerging field of global limnology. I received my B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from UW – Madison. Before starting graduate school, I worked as a programmer and hardware engineer designing and deploying instrumented buoy systems in Wisconsin lakes and developing software to stream and archive the streaming data they provided.

 

Samantha Oliver, PhD Student

Samantha Oliver
I am a PhD student at the University of Wisconsin Madison at the Center for Limnology. My research interests include aquatic food webs and how nutrients move through lake systems via physical and biological processes. I received my B.S. in Wildlife Ecology from the University of Wisconsin Madison and my M.S. in Integrated Biology from the University of Minnesota Duluth, where I studied nutrient recycling by zooplankton in Lake Superior. Before graduate school, I spent a year in AmeriCorps working for the National Park Service as an aquatic monitoring intern. I currently serve on the Board of Directors for the International Association of Great Lakes Research.

 

Mary Tate Bremigan, Collaborator

Mary Tate Bremigan
I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife. I enjoy conducting collaborative research that bridges the fields of landscape limnology and fisheries management. By viewing lakes as embedded in a spatially-hierarchical landscape of aquatic, terrestrial, and human components, I seek to quantify the response of lake fish populations, fish assemblages, and food webs to human stressors. I also work closely with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources Fisheries Division to develop, implement, and evaluate strategies for managing Michigan's inland waterbodies. Currently my lab is: (1) integrating multi-lake behavioral observations and genetic analyses to evaluate the effects of spring angling and residential shoreline development on the sustainability of black bass populations, (2) using stable isotope analysis to evaluate the effects of residential shoreline development on benthic-pelagic food web linkages, (3) conducting a literature review and meta-analysis to determine if sportfishing regulations achieve their biological and social goals, and (4) using spatially-explicit data spanning multiple states to quantify cross-scale interactions among hydrogeomorphic landscape features and human stressors (land cover change, dams, and stocking) that affect fish assemblages.

 

Paul Hanson, Collaborator

Paul Hanson
I am a Research Professor at the University of Wisconsin, Center for Limnology. My research group focuses on biogeochemical and plankton processes in lakes across a broad range of scales, from high frequency dynamics within lake habitats to long-term trends at the regional scale. Our work has advanced understanding of the controls of ecosystem-scale primary productivity and respiration, and the consequences of these metabolic processes for lake carbon cycling. We have applied lessons learned from well-studied lakes to lakes at the regional scale to better understand how lakes interact with their surrounding watersheds to control storage and transformation of carbon at the landscape scale. Achieving these results has required analytical techniques that exploit the information content of data sets obtained from lake sensor networks, as well as data from more traditional methodologies. I also have been involved in the foundation and management of the Global Lake Ecological Observatory Network (GLEON), a grass-roots network of information technology experts and lake scientists. GLEON includes more than 300 members from more than 30 countries. The science and technology from GLEON addresses a broad range of topics, from phytoplankton community dynamics, to lake carbon cycling, to lake physics and climate change. GLEON has provided unique training and research experience in network science for its more than 100 graduate students.

 

Craig Stow, Collaborator

Craig Stow
I am a scientist at the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory in Ann Arbor, MI. My interests include predictive modeling and Bayesian inference for uncertainty quantification to support environmental management decision-making. Much of my research involves stressor-response interactions in aquatic ecosystems; currently I am involved in a project examining the changes that have occurred in phosphorus cycling in Saginaw Bay, Lake Huron since the dreissenid mussel invasion. I received a B.S. from Cornell University in Environmental Technology, M.S. from Louisiana State University in Marine Sciences, and PhD from Duke University in Environmental Modeling.

 

Ty Wagner, Collaborator

Ty Wagner
I am the Assistant Unit Leader at the Pennsylvania Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit (http://www.coopunits.org/Pennsylvania/) and Adjunct Associate Professor of Fisheries Ecology at Pennsylvania State University. My research interests include fisheries management and ecology, landscape limnology, and the application of multilevel models to elucidate drivers of ecological processes that operate across multiple spatial and temporal hierarchical scales. I received my BS and MS degrees from the University of Idaho and my PhD from Michigan State University.

 

Katherine Webster, Collaborator

Katherine Webster
I am an Honorary Researcher at Queen's University, Belfast. My research focus is in the field of landscape limnology, which incorporates understanding of natural features and human disturbances that influence freshwater ecosystems at multiple spatial and temporal scales. I conduct research on macroscale spatial patterns and long-term trends in the trophic status of lakes and rivers in the northeast US and the interactions between hydromorphology and nutrient pressures and biotic communities in streams in Northern Ireland. I received my B.Sc. from McGill University and M.Sc. and PhD from the Center for Limnology at the University of Wisconsin. I am a member of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography and the Ecological Society of America.

 

Emily Norton, Collaborator

Emily Norton
I am the Oregon State University Open Campus Coordinator in Tillamook County, which is a program focused on providing a variety of educational opportunities to rural communities. My research interests include the impacts of the terrestrial landscape, including the human landscape, on aquatic resources and the management implications of these impacts. I am also interested in the science of teaching and learning, with an emphasis on student motivation and attitudes towards science. I received my B.S. in Biology from Purdue University and my dual Ph.D. in Fisheries and Wildlife and Ecology, Evolutionary Biology, and Behavior (with a specialization in Environmental Science and Policy) at Michigan State University. Before joining the MSU Limnology Laboratory, I worked as an Environmental Scientist for the Indiana Department of Natural Resources where I was responsible for permitting projects along lakes and streams.
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