Materials

The potential for developing new useful materials is virtually unbounded, both from a nanoscale perspective and from a biomaterials perspective. Nanomaterials research impacts on our nanomedicine efforts, on infrastructure security research, and on alternative energy efforts, inter alia. We also have growing strength in surface coating technology, which impacts on both health and manufacturing problems.

Metals, Polymers & Ceramics

Topical Area - Physical Metallurgy ResearchIn-Situ Testing

Strength Areas

  • High Temperature Creep and Fatigue Testing
  • In-Situ Tensile-Creep Testing inside an SEM
  • Scanning Electron Microscopy
  • Electron Backscatter Diffraction
  • Phase Transformations
  • Titanium, Ni-base Superalloys, Co-base Alloys, Magnesium Alloys, and Metal Matrix Composites
  • Deformation Mechanisms
  • Lead-Free Solders
  • Materials Under Extreme Environments
  • Structural Alloys for Aerospace, Automotive, Energy, and Sports Applications
  • Biomedical Implant Alloys

We are at the forefront of developing new in-situ electron microscopy techniques to characterize the deformation behavior as a function of crystallographic orientation of metal alloys at high temperature and high resolution.

In terms of biomedical implant alloys and tissue engineering, we are developing new biocompatible ceramics and alloys (titanium) and modifying their surfaces for enhanced osseointegration with the body

We also have active projects involved in grain boundary engineering of superalloys for enhanced high temperature strength and creep resistance for aerospace engines.

Strength Areas by Faculty Slip Trace Analysis

  • Thomas Bieler: mechanical deformation of metallic materials: cold, warm and hot deformation, creep, superplasticity, high strain rate deformation, electron microscopy, synchrotron x-ray diffraction, orientation imaging microscopy (EBSP mapping); texture and microtexture, damage nucleation; crystal plasticity finite element simulations of deformation in titanium alloys, solders, intermetallics, refractory metals
  • Carl Boehlert: materials engineering; materials sciences; metallurgy; electron backscatter diffraction; intermetallics electron microscopy; metal matrix composites; titanium alloys and composites; mechanical behavior
  • Martin Crimp: deformation and fracture of metals, ordered intermetallic alloys, high temperature materials, transmission electron microscopy, diffraction studies using scanning electron microscopyPhotos of In-situ Creep Testing Setup
  • David Grummon: superelasticity and shape-memory in titanium-nickel thin films; microactuators, thermoelastic martensite transformations; ion beam surface modification of materials; surface effects in fatigue crack initiation; mechanical metallurgy
  • James Lucas: microstructure evolution/characterization of Pb-free solders alloys and their composites; nanoindentation characterization of deformation in small-volumes and thin films; moisture effects in resin matrix composites; metal matrix composite
  • Farhang Pourboghrat: warm forming; metal and composite sheet thermo-hydroforming; tube hydroforming; temperature and rate-dependent material models; polycrystalline plasticity models; temperature dependent forming limit diagrams (FLD); fracture and damage mechanics
  • K. Subramanian: mechanical properties of metals and ceramics, crystallization of glasses, erosion, composite materials, lead-free electronic solders
  • Xinran Xiao: mechanical behaviors of engineering materials, fatigue, fracture, creep, impact, crashworthiness and extreme loadings; polymers, polymer composites, metals, lithium-ion batteries; constitutive modeling, multiscale, multiphysics modeling

Topical Area - Polymers Research

Strength Areas by Faculty

  • Andre Benard: transport phenomena in materials processing, heat transfer, polymers and composites microstructures, multiphase problems, finite elementsNeeraj Buch
  • Neeraj Buch: concrete pavement design, rehabilitation, non-destructive testing of pavements, and composite materials; development of rut and fatigue prediction models for flexible pavements design
  • Christina Chan: optimizing polymeric delivery vehicles for siRNA delivery and using thin polymeric films to construct tissue engineering platforms with desired physical, chemical, and mechanical surface properties to support cellular environment for regenerative medicine
  • Shishir Chundawat: lignocellulosic biomass deconstruction to fuels, chemicals & materials via catalysis/biocatalysis inspired routes; supramolecular organization & chemistry of biopolymers
  • Lawrence Drzal: graphene; graphite; carbon; cellulose; nanoparticles; nanotechnology; nanocomposites, surfaces; interfaces; polymers, adhesion, surface chemistry; surface characterization; polymer composite processing; ultraviolet light; cellulose nanowhiskers; microfibers; batteries; solar cells; supercapacitors; conductive films
  • Daniel Graiver: polymerization, polymer processing, biodegradable polymer systems, micro and nanostructures in polymer systems, reactive extrusion processing, ozonation, copolymers compatible blends and graft copolymers, composites, biobased and recyclable composites
  • Andre Lee: viscoelastic and time-dependent properties of polymers and polymeric glasses; structure-property relationships of inorganic-organic hybrid polymers and nanocomposites; processing of hybrid nano-reinforced polymer; nanostructured materials
  • Jeff Sakamoto: ultraporous inorganic and organic gels for energy and biomedicine; ceramic oxide electrolytes for solid state lithium batteries and semi fuel cells, high temperature thermal insulation and highly ordered and hierarchically ordered organic gels for nerve repair
  • Xinran Xiao: mechanical behaviors of engineering materials, fatigue, fracture, creep, impact, crashworthiness and extreme loadings; polymers, polymer composites, metals, lithium-ion batteries; constitutive modeling, multiscale, multiphysics modeling

Topical Area - Ceramics Research

Strength Areas

  • Thermoelectric ceramics, ceramics for advanced batteries, sol-gel processing
  • Bioceramics, ceramics for water filtration
  • Electronic ceramics, including battery materials
  • Solid oxide fuel cells, sintering theory
  • Mechanical properties of thermoelectric ceramics, ceramics for advanced batteries and bioceramics

Strength Areas by FacultyGraphic representation of Nelson Sepulveda's research in materials

  • Melissa Baumann: processing/characterization of biomaterials for tissue engineering (bone, cartilage). Optimizing cell biomaterial interactions. Materials science: processing behavior of ceramics and ceramic composites, surface chemistry and colloidal chemistry
  • Eldon Case: mechanical properties of thermoelectric ceramics, ceramics for advanced batteries and bioceramics
  • Patrick Kwon: manufacturing processes, mechanical behavior of ceramics, functionally gradient materials
  • Wei Lai: electronic ceramics, including battery materials
  • Jason Nicholas: solid oxide fuel cells, sintering theory
  • Jeff Sakamoto: ultraporous inorganic and organic gels for energy and biomedicine; ceramic oxide electrolytes for solid state lithium batteries and semi fuel cells, high temperature thermal insulation and highly ordered and hierarchically ordered organic gels for nerve repair
  • Nelson Sepulveda: micro and nanometer-sized sensors and actuators (or transducers), MEMS, characterization of smart and multifunctional materials and their integration in microsystems (Image and citation as a PDF)
  • K. Subramanian: mechanical properties of metals and ceramics, crystallization of glasses, erosion, composite materials, lead-free electronic solders

Click here to read more about our faculty in Materials Research. Or click on the Research-Related Faculty block in the upper right corner.