NSF grad fellowship awarded

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April 4, 2016

NSF Graduate Research Fellowship will advance Maria Castano’s work in autonomous robotic fish 

A PhD student in the Michigan State University College of Engineering has received a 2016 National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellowship to continue her work on the control system for Grace, MSU’s gliding robotic fish, and other small robotic fish being developed at Michigan State.Maria Castano has received a 2016 National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship to continue her work on the control system for Grace, MSU’s gliding robotic fish.

Maria Castano works with MSU Foundation Professor Xiaobo Tan, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, whose research group is advancing the use of small robotic fish to improve the health of the Great Lakes by tracking invasive species. See a video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2GGqB_GX8Wg&feature=youtu.be 

“My work will focus on investigating methods to coordinate and control different locomotion modes on autonomous, multimodal robots,” Castano explained. “Receiving this fellowship is incredible and unbelievable,” she continued. “I hope I am able to contribute to society and the scientific community.” 

Castano is a PhD student in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. She was among hundreds of graduate students who presented their research at the MSU Engineering Graduate Research Symposium on March 31. Castano presented “Non-Linear Model Predictive control of the tail-actuated robotic fish.” 

Originally from Venezuela, she earned a bachelor’s degree in electrical engineering from Florida International University in May 2014. 

The NSF’s Graduate Research Fellowship Program recognizes and supports outstanding graduate students who are pursuing research-based master's and doctoral degrees in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) and STEM education. This year’s awards went to 2,000 individuals out of 17,000 applicants. 

The program provides three years of financial support for graduate studies.

Maria Castano