National president

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March 14, 2016

Wolff to lead national civil engineering honor society 

Thomas F. Wolff of Michigan State University has been elected national president of the 119,000-member civil engineering honor society, Chi Epsilon.Thomas F. Wolff was presented the gavel last week in Boston and is the new national president of the civil engineering honor society, Chi Epsilon.

Wolff took office during the Chi Epsilon’s 44th National Conclave, March 10-12, at Northeastern University in Boston. More than 200 students representing more than 100 university chapters attended the event. Wolff will serve a two-year term under the theme, “Vision 2022 – the Next 100 Years.”

“For 96 years, Chi Epsilon has recognized the top students in civil engineering and related fields, and promoted service and professionalism by its members,” Wolff explained. “Members are elected primarily as students, but are members for life. Our students at this year’s conclave defined a new vision of ‘fostering excellence, connectivity, and engagement among those in the civil engineering community to improve our world.’ I am honored and humbled to be chosen to lead this endeavor,” he added. 

Wolff became a member of Chi Epsilon at the University of Missouri-Rolla (now Missouri S&T) in 1969, and served as faculty advisor at Michigan State from 1987 to 1998. He was elevated to Chapter Honor Member at MSU in 1991. 

He has served the national organization in several leadership roles including Great Lakes District Councillor since 2010, national marshal from 2010-12, and vice president from 2012-16, prior to becoming president of the national honor society. 

At MSU, Wolff spent 17 years as associate dean for undergraduate studies in the College of Engineering and currently serves as interim chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. 

Chi Epsilon was founded in 1922 at the University of Illinois to foster the development of character and technical ability among civil engineers. Its four pillars are scholarship, character, practicality, and sociability. Nationwide, Chi Epsilon has 131 active chapters and 118,973 members. Its headquarters are in Arlington, Texas. 

The MSU chapter of Chi Epsilon was founded in 1951 and has elected more than 1,600 members.

Thomas F. Wolff spent 17 years as associate dean for undergraduate studies in the MSU College of Engineering and is currently serving as the interim chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Michigan State.