STEMing forward

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Nov. 10, 2015

Support for STEM gaining in state of Michigan 

Two recent Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) efforts in Michigan will help the state steam forward on the current lack of STEM skills in schoolchildren and job applicants. 

Leo Kempel, dean of the MSU College of Engineering, said both advances in engineering education are critical for the future of the Michigan economy.MSU College of Engineering Dean Leo Kempel said advancing STEM education in Michigan is critical for the future of the Michigan economy. "Encouraging children -- at an early age -- to see themselves as computer scientists and engineers is necessary to maintain our historic strength in technological innovation," he said.

“Michigan has the highest number of engineers per capita of any state in the nation,” Kempel said. “Encouraging children – at an early age – to see themselves as computer scientists and engineers is necessary to maintain our historic strength in technological innovation,” he added. 

Earlier this week, the new Michigan State University STEM Center for the Great Lakes Bay Region was introduced in Midland. The new center will focus on motivating teachers, encouraging students, and empowering young people to pursue careers in STEM. 

It is made possible with support from The Herbert H. and Grace A. Dow Foundation, the Rollin M. Gerstacker Foundation, the Charles J. Strosacker Foundation, and the Dow Chemical Company Foundation. 

Together with MSU, the partners will invest $10 million into a curriculum targeted at K-12 learners, select courses for college students, and innovative teacher enrichment programs. 

For more on the STEM Center in Midland, visit MSUToday. 

Coming next week, the Michigan’s State Board of Education votes on new science standards that would, for the first time, require students to learn engineering. 

The proposed science standards will introduce engineering to all Michigan students – beginning in kindergarten. 

Read more on “Michigan kids may soon be required to learn engineering” and listen to a story by Gabrielle Emanuel on MICHIGAN RADIO.