Global Engineering Programs

MSU Engineers are advancing knowledge and transforming lives as they engage with partners around the world. Our scientists are working on sustainable energy research, environmental and water solutions, engineering design challenges and next generation cyber technologies that lead developments in academic, public sector and private corporate advances. Collaborative research and applied learning opportunities form the basis for global partnerships centered around problem solving.


 

 

In The News

 

MSU Academy for Global Engagement Names 2017 Fellows

From developing the technology to run autonomous vehicles to improving the reliability of the power system in remote Africa, 10 new fellows in the MSU Academy for Global Engagement have the opportunity to expand their research and contribute to a new generation of international experts.

Click here to read the full news article.

 

MSU Executive Vice President Satish Udpa, Indian Institute of Technology Madras Director Bhaskar Ramamurthy, MSU Engineering Dean Leo Kempel, and IIT Madras International and Alumni Relations Dean R. Nagarajan formalize the dual PhD program that will ensure graduates are globally engaged.

Advocating for Future Engineers in India

 

MSU Signs dual PhD agreements with two noted technology institutes in India

 

Michigan State University has signed agreements with two leading institutes of technology in India to strengthen the intellectual infrastructure and international collaborations at all three academic institutions.

Click here to read the full news article.

 

A close-up image of a diamond

Diamonds: An Engineer's Best Friend 

Growing Diamonds

 

Michigan State University Fraunhofer Center has been transformed into a high-tech diamond mine of sorts as Spartan engineers "grow" the precious gems layer by layer.

Click here to read more and see the YouTube video.

 

Back to Zambia

Spartan Engineer Adam Lyman returns to Zambia to continue development of a human-powered thresher that processes common beans four times faster than manual harvesting.

Adam Lyman ’15 goes back to Africa to work on bicycle powered bean thresher for farmers

Spartan Engineer Adam Lyman returns to Zambia next week to continue the research and development of a bicycle powered bean thresher for small-scale farmers in

Zambia. The low-cost, human-powered thresher processes common beans four times faster than manual threshing.

Click here to read the full news article.

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